Invest In A Health Savings Account Instead Of An Insurance Company

Despite the alarming cost of health care in the U.S., the largest health insurance companies continue to post record profits for three straight years. While you might think those profits are straight out of frequent and large premium increases, another trend is driving insurer profits.

Bigger co-payments to see a doctor may be discouraging people from making doctor appointments. Even among those with health insurance benefits, covered members are seeking less health care. Health insurers just continue to pocket the premiums whether or not they spend much on doctor and hospital care for members.

With health care reform, insurers are being required to spend at least 80 percent of the premiums collected on health care for the members paying those premiums. That could take a bite out of record profits, but insurers also have another advantage.

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High-deductible health insurance plans have been seen to discourage health care consumption. To lessen the risk of people putting off seeing a doctor until their health deteriorates, health care reform has also taken a lot of the risk out of plans with high deductibles.

High-deductible Health Insurance Plans Totally Cover Preventive Care

As premiums rose, both companies offering employees health insurance and people shopping for their own health insurance switched to high-deductible health insurance plans to keep their insurance premiums low. Before health care reform, policyholders were hesitant to spend from $1,000 to $10,000 to meet the deductible. That meant not seeing a doctor for far too many people.

Health care reform doesn’t change